Advances in Humanities Research

Advances in Humanities Research

Vol. 4, 27 February 2024


Open Access | Article

Healing Gardens from the Perspective of Oriental Gardens – Therapeutic Landscapes

Laiyi Liu * 1
1 Tianjin University

* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.

Advances in Humanities Research, Vol. 4, 92-104
Published 27 February 2024. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by EWA Publishing
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Citation Laiyi Liu. Healing Gardens from the Perspective of Oriental Gardens – Therapeutic Landscapes. AHR (2024) Vol. 4: 92-104.

Abstract

Healing gardens, originating from developed Western countries such as the United States, play a crucial role in enhancing both physiological and psychological well-being, as well as rehabilitation. Classical Chinese gardens inherently embody profound elements conducive to health, yet unlike Western Healing gardens, they have not formed a scientific research system. This paper delves into the literature and imagery to comprehensively understand the therapeutic concepts embedded in traditional Chinese gardens. Building upon the existing Western frameworks and the foundation of Chinese culture, it constructs a relatively comprehensive perspective of Healing gardens from the standpoint of Oriental gardens. Furthermore, the paper summarizes and anticipates the research on Healing gardens in China within this context.

Keywords

Therapeutic landscapes, Healing gardens, Classical gardens

References

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Data Availability

The datasets used and/or analyzed during the current study will be available from the authors upon reasonable request.

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Volume Title
ISBN (Print)
ISBN (Online)
Published Date
27 February 2024
Series
Advances in Humanities Research
ISSN (Print)
2753-7080
ISSN (Online)
2753-7099
DOI
Copyright
© 2023 The Author(s)
Open Access
This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited

Copyright © 2023 EWA Publishing. Unless Otherwise Stated